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Chewing-gum Acérola - Dietaroma

Chewing-gum Acérola - Dietaroma

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Barcode: 3460341503320 (EAN / EAN-13)

Brands: Dietaroma

Categories: Snacks, Sweet snacks, Confectioneries, Chewing gum

Countries where sold: France

Matching with your preferences

Health

Ingredients

  • icon

    20 ingredients


    French: Edulcorants : xylitol, sorbitol ; gomme base d'origine naturelle ; édulcorant : sirop de maltitol ; extrait d'Acérola (Malpigha glabra) ; arôme naturel d'orange avec autres arômes naturels ; émulsifiant : lécithine de tournesol ; épaississant : gomme arabique ; arôme naturel ; édulcorant : sucralose ; arôme naturel de citron ; agent d'enrobage : cire de carnauba.

Food processing

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    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Additive: E414 - Acacia gum
    • Additive: E420 - Sorbitol
    • Additive: E903 - Carnauba wax
    • Additive: E955 - Sucralose
    • Additive: E965 - Maltitol
    • Additive: E967 - Xylitol
    • Ingredient: Emulsifier
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Glazing agent
    • Ingredient: Sweetener
    • Ingredient: Thickener

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E414 - Acacia gum


    Gum arabic: Gum arabic, also known as acacia gum, arabic gum, gum acacia, acacia, Senegal gum and Indian gum, and by other names, is a natural gum consisting of the hardened sap of various species of the acacia tree. Originally, gum arabic was collected from Acacia nilotica which was called the "gum arabic tree"; in the present day, gum arabic is collected from acacia species, predominantly Acacia senegal and Vachellia -Acacia- seyal; the term "gum arabic" does not indicate a particular botanical source. In a few cases so‐called "gum arabic" may not even have been collected from Acacia species, but may originate from Combretum, Albizia or some other genus. Producers harvest the gum commercially from wild trees, mostly in Sudan -80%- and throughout the Sahel, from Senegal to Somalia—though it is historically cultivated in Arabia and West Asia. Gum arabic is a complex mixture of glycoproteins and polysaccharides. It is the original source of the sugars arabinose and ribose, both of which were first discovered and isolated from it, and are named after it. Gum arabic is soluble in water. It is edible, and used primarily in the food industry as a stabilizer, with EU E number E414. Gum arabic is a key ingredient in traditional lithography and is used in printing, paint production, glue, cosmetics and various industrial applications, including viscosity control in inks and in textile industries, though less expensive materials compete with it for many of these roles. While gum arabic is now produced throughout the African Sahel, it is still harvested and used in the Middle East.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E420 - Sorbitol


    Sorbitol: Sorbitol --, less commonly known as glucitol --, is a sugar alcohol with a sweet taste which the human body metabolizes slowly. It can be obtained by reduction of glucose, which changes the aldehyde group to a hydroxyl group. Most sorbitol is made from corn syrup, but it is also found in nature, for example in apples, pears, peaches, and prunes. It is converted to fructose by sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. Sorbitol is an isomer of mannitol, another sugar alcohol; the two differ only in the orientation of the hydroxyl group on carbon 2. While similar, the two sugar alcohols have very different sources in nature, melting points, and uses.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E903 - Carnauba wax


    Carnauba wax: Carnauba -; Portuguese: carnaúba [kaʁnɐˈubɐ]-, also called Brazil wax and palm wax, is a wax of the leaves of the palm Copernicia prunifera -Synonym: Copernicia cerifera-, a plant native to and grown only in the northeastern Brazilian states of Piauí, Ceará, Maranhão, Bahia, and Rio Grande do Norte. It is known as "queen of waxes" and in its pure state, usually comes in the form of hard yellow-brown flakes. It is obtained from the leaves of the carnauba palm by collecting and drying them, beating them to loosen the wax, then refining and bleaching the wax.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E955 - Sucralose


    Sucralose: Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and sugar substitute. The majority of ingested sucralose is not broken down by the body, so it is noncaloric. In the European Union, it is also known under the E number E955. It is produced by chlorination of sucrose. Sucralose is about 320 to 1‚000 times sweeter than sucrose, three times as sweet as both aspartame and acesulfame potassium, and twice as sweet as sodium saccharin. Evidence of benefit is lacking for long-term weight loss with some data supporting weight gain and heart disease risks.It is stable under heat and over a broad range of pH conditions. Therefore, it can be used in baking or in products that require a long shelf life. The commercial success of sucralose-based products stems from its favorable comparison to other low-calorie sweeteners in terms of taste, stability, and safety. Common brand names of sucralose-based sweeteners are Splenda, Zerocal, Sukrana, SucraPlus, Candys, Cukren, and Nevella. Canderel Yellow also contains sucralose, but the original Canderel and Green Canderel do not.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E965 - Maltitol


    Maltitol: Maltitol is a sugar alcohol -a polyol- used as a sugar substitute. It has 75–90% of the sweetness of sucrose -table sugar- and nearly identical properties, except for browning. It is used to replace table sugar because it is half as caloric, does not promote tooth decay, and has a somewhat lesser effect on blood glucose. In chemical terms, maltitol is known as 4-O-α-glucopyranosyl-D-sorbitol. It is used in commercial products under trade names such as Lesys, Maltisweet and SweetPearl.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E965ii - Maltitol syrup


    Maltitol: Maltitol is a sugar alcohol -a polyol- used as a sugar substitute. It has 75–90% of the sweetness of sucrose -table sugar- and nearly identical properties, except for browning. It is used to replace table sugar because it is half as caloric, does not promote tooth decay, and has a somewhat lesser effect on blood glucose. In chemical terms, maltitol is known as 4-O-α-glucopyranosyl-D-sorbitol. It is used in commercial products under trade names such as Lesys, Maltisweet and SweetPearl.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E967 - Xylitol


    Xylitol: Xylitol is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener. The name derives from Ancient Greek: ξύλον, xyl[on], "wood" + suffix -itol, used to denote sugar alcohols. Xylitol is categorized as a polyalcohol or sugar alcohol -specifically an alditol-. It has the formula CH2OH-CHOH-3CH2OH. It is a colorless or white solid that is soluble in water. Use of manufactured products containing xylitol may reduce tooth decay.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

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    Palm oil free


    No ingredients containing palm oil detected

    Unrecognized ingredients: fr:malpigha-glabra

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

  • icon

    Vegan status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Gum base, fr:malpigha-glabra

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

  • icon

    Vegetarian status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Gum base, fr:malpigha-glabra

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients

    We need your help!

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

    Edulcorants (xylitol), sorbitol, gomme base, édulcorant (sirop de maltitol), extrait d'Acérola (Malpigha glabra), arôme naturel d'orange, arômes naturels, émulsifiant (lécithine de tournesol), épaississant (gomme arabique), arôme naturel, édulcorant (sucralose), arôme naturel de citron, agent d'enrobage (cire de carnauba)
    1. Edulcorants -> en:sweetener - percent_min: 7.69230769230769 - percent_max: 100
      1. xylitol -> en:e967 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 7.69230769230769 - percent_max: 100
    2. sorbitol -> en:e420 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 50
    3. gomme base -> en:gum-base - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 33.3333333333333
    4. édulcorant -> en:sweetener - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
      1. sirop de maltitol -> en:e965ii - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
    5. extrait d'Acérola -> en:acerola-juice - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 20
      1. Malpigha glabra -> fr:malpigha-glabra - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 20
    6. arôme naturel d'orange -> en:natural-orange-flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 16.6666666666667
    7. arômes naturels -> en:natural-flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 14.2857142857143
    8. émulsifiant -> en:emulsifier - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 12.5
      1. lécithine de tournesol -> en:sunflower-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 12.5
    9. épaississant -> en:thickener - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 11.1111111111111
      1. gomme arabique -> en:e414 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 11.1111111111111
    10. arôme naturel -> en:natural-flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 10
    11. édulcorant -> en:sweetener - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 9.09090909090909
      1. sucralose -> en:e955 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 9.09090909090909
    12. arôme naturel de citron -> en:natural-lemon-flavouring - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 8.33333333333333
    13. agent d'enrobage -> en:glazing-agent - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 7.69230769230769
      1. cire de carnauba -> en:e903 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 7.69230769230769

Nutrition

  • icon

    Sugars in low quantity (0.1%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of sugar can cause weight gain and tooth decay. It also augments the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of sugar and sugary drinks
    • Sugary drinks (such as sodas, fruit beverages, and fruit juices and nectars) should be limited as much as possible (no more than 1 glass a day).
    • Choose products with lower sugar content and reduce the consumption of products with added sugars.
  • icon

    Salt in low quantity (0.1%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
    • Many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, as there are often no symptoms.
    • Most people consume too much salt (on average 9 to 12 grams per day), around twice the recommended maximum level of intake.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of salt and salted food
    • Reduce the quantity of salt used when cooking, and don't salt again at the table.
    • Limit the consumption of salty snacks and choose products with lower salt content.

  • icon

    Nutrition facts


    Nutrition facts As sold
    for 100 g / 100 ml
    Compared to: Chewing gum
    Energy 795 kj
    (190 kcal)
    +10%
    Fat 0.6 g +141%
    Saturated fat 0 g -100%
    Carbohydrates 75.3 g +17%
    Sugars 0.1 g -98%
    Fiber 0.4 g +2%
    Proteins 0 g -100%
    Salt 0.1 g +262%
    Fruits‚ vegetables‚ nuts and rapeseed‚ walnut and olive oils (estimate from ingredients list analysis) 0 %

Environment

Packaging

Transportation

Data sources

Product added on by kiliweb
Last edit of product page on by quechoisir.
Product page also edited by openfoodfacts-contributors, raphael0202, teolemon, yuka.UWZra0UvZ0srTjQwbS9ZVHowM1V5dnRvOXBtM1JIbTFldkVqSVE9PQ, yuka.YTZZREtvVmZxNmM3cGNVZjN3M2NvL1pjNTU2MGNFNjVDTlUxSVE9PQ.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.