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Skittles chewies - 45 g

Skittles chewies - 45 g

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Barcode: 4009900526982 (EAN / EAN-13)

Common name: Chewy candies with fruit flavours

Quantity: 45 g

Packaging: Plastic

Brands: Skittles, Mars

Categories: Snacks, Sweet snacks, Confectioneries, Candies

Stores: SuperValu, Karkki & Herkku

Countries where sold: Finland, France, Ireland

Matching with your preferences

Health

Ingredients

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    23 ingredients


    sugar, glucose syrup, palm fat, acids malic acid, citric acid, dextrin, modified starch, maltodextrin, flavourings, emulsifier lecithin, colours e163, e162, e160a, e141, e153, palm kernel oil, concentrates (sweet potato, carthamus, radish)

Food processing

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    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E1400 - Dextrin
    • Additive: E141 - Copper complexes of chlorophylls and chlorophyllins
    • Additive: E14XX - Modified Starch
    • Additive: E153 - Vegetable carbon
    • Additive: E160a - Carotene
    • Additive: E162 - Beetroot red
    • Additive: E163 - Anthocyanins
    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Ingredient: Colour
    • Ingredient: Emulsifier
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Glucose
    • Ingredient: Glucose syrup

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E1400 - Dextrin


    Dextrin: Dextrins are a group of low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen. Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α--1→4- or α--1→6- glycosidic bonds. Dextrins can be produced from starch using enzymes like amylases, as during digestion in the human body and during malting and mashing, or by applying dry heat under acidic conditions -pyrolysis or roasting-. The latter process is used industrially, and also occurs on the surface of bread during the baking process, contributing to flavor, color and crispness. Dextrins produced by heat are also known as pyrodextrins. The starch hydrolyses during roasting under acidic conditions, and short-chained starch parts partially rebranch with α--1‚6- bonds to the degraded starch molecule. See also Maillard Reaction. Dextrins are white, yellow, or brown powders that are partially or fully water-soluble, yielding optically active solutions of low viscosity. Most of them can be detected with iodine solution, giving a red coloration; one distinguishes erythrodextrin -dextrin that colours red- and achrodextrin -giving no colour-. White and yellow dextrins from starch roasted with little or no acid are called British gum.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E160a - Carotene


    Carotene: The term carotene -also carotin, from the Latin carota, "carrot"- is used for many related unsaturated hydrocarbon substances having the formula C40Hx, which are synthesized by plants but in general cannot be made by animals -with the exception of some aphids and spider mites which acquired the synthesizing genes from fungi-. Carotenes are photosynthetic pigments important for photosynthesis. Carotenes contain no oxygen atoms. They absorb ultraviolet, violet, and blue light and scatter orange or red light, and -in low concentrations- yellow light. Carotenes are responsible for the orange colour of the carrot, for which this class of chemicals is named, and for the colours of many other fruits, vegetables and fungi -for example, sweet potatoes, chanterelle and orange cantaloupe melon-. Carotenes are also responsible for the orange -but not all of the yellow- colours in dry foliage. They also -in lower concentrations- impart the yellow coloration to milk-fat and butter. Omnivorous animal species which are relatively poor converters of coloured dietary carotenoids to colourless retinoids have yellowed-coloured body fat, as a result of the carotenoid retention from the vegetable portion of their diet. The typical yellow-coloured fat of humans and chickens is a result of fat storage of carotenes from their diets. Carotenes contribute to photosynthesis by transmitting the light energy they absorb to chlorophyll. They also protect plant tissues by helping to absorb the energy from singlet oxygen, an excited form of the oxygen molecule O2 which is formed during photosynthesis. β-Carotene is composed of two retinyl groups, and is broken down in the mucosa of the human small intestine by β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase to retinal, a form of vitamin A. β-Carotene can be stored in the liver and body fat and converted to retinal as needed, thus making it a form of vitamin A for humans and some other mammals. The carotenes α-carotene and γ-carotene, due to their single retinyl group -β-ionone ring-, also have some vitamin A activity -though less than β-carotene-, as does the xanthophyll carotenoid β-cryptoxanthin. All other carotenoids, including lycopene, have no beta-ring and thus no vitamin A activity -although they may have antioxidant activity and thus biological activity in other ways-. Animal species differ greatly in their ability to convert retinyl -beta-ionone- containing carotenoids to retinals. Carnivores in general are poor converters of dietary ionone-containing carotenoids. Pure carnivores such as ferrets lack β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase and cannot convert any carotenoids to retinals at all -resulting in carotenes not being a form of vitamin A for this species-; while cats can convert a trace of β-carotene to retinol, although the amount is totally insufficient for meeting their daily retinol needs.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E162 - Beetroot red


    Betanin: Betanin, or Beetroot Red, is a red glycosidic food dye obtained from beets; its aglycone, obtained by hydrolyzing away the glucose molecule, is betanidin. As a food additive, its E number is E162. The color of betanin depends on pH; between four and five it is bright bluish-red, becoming blue-violet as the pH increases. Once the pH reaches alkaline levels betanin degrades by hydrolysis, resulting in a yellow-brown color. Betanin is a betalain pigment, together with isobetanin, probetanin, and neobetanin. Other pigments contained in beet are indicaxanthin and vulgaxanthins.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E163 - Anthocyanins


    Anthocyanin: Anthocyanins -also anthocyans; from Greek: ἄνθος -anthos- "flower" and κυάνεος/κυανοῦς kyaneos/kyanous "dark blue"- are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that, depending on their pH, may appear red, purple, or blue. Food plants rich in anthocyanins include the blueberry, raspberry, black rice, and black soybean, among many others that are red, blue, purple, or black. Some of the colors of autumn leaves are derived from anthocyanins.Anthocyanins belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway. They occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthocyanins are derived from anthocyanidins by adding sugars. They are odorless and moderately astringent. Although approved to color foods and beverages in the European Union, anthocyanins are not approved for use as a food additive because they have not been verified as safe when used as food or supplement ingredients. There is no conclusive evidence anthocyanins have any effect on human biology or diseases.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E296 - Malic acid


    Malic acid: Malic acid is an organic compound with the molecular formula C4H6O5. It is a dicarboxylic acid that is made by all living organisms, contributes to the pleasantly sour taste of fruits, and is used as a food additive. Malic acid has two stereoisomeric forms -L- and D-enantiomers-, though only the L-isomer exists naturally. The salts and esters of malic acid are known as malates. The malate anion is an intermediate in the citric acid cycle.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E330 - Citric acid


    Citric acid: Citric acid is a weak organic acid that has the chemical formula C6H8O7. It occurs naturally in citrus fruits. In biochemistry, it is an intermediate in the citric acid cycle, which occurs in the metabolism of all aerobic organisms. More than a million tons of citric acid are manufactured every year. It is used widely as an acidifier, as a flavoring and chelating agent.A citrate is a derivative of citric acid; that is, the salts, esters, and the polyatomic anion found in solution. An example of the former, a salt is trisodium citrate; an ester is triethyl citrate. When part of a salt, the formula of the citrate ion is written as C6H5O3−7 or C3H5O-COO-3−3.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

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    Palm oil


    Ingredients that contain palm oil: Palm fat, Palm kernel oil
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    Vegan status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Concentrates

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

  • icon

    Vegetarian status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Concentrates

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients

    We need your help!

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

    sugar, glucose syrup, palm fat, acids (malic acid), citric acid, dextrin, modified starch, maltodextrin, flavourings, emulsifier (lecithin), colours (e163), e162, e160a, e141, e153, palm kernel oil, concentrates (sweet potato, carthamus, radish)
    1. sugar -> en:sugar - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 5.88235294117647 - percent_max: 100
    2. glucose syrup -> en:glucose-syrup - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 50
    3. palm fat -> en:palm-fat - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - from_palm_oil: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 33.3333333333333
    4. acids -> en:acid - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
      1. malic acid -> en:e296 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
    5. citric acid -> en:e330 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 20
    6. dextrin -> en:e1400 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 16.6666666666667
    7. modified starch -> en:modified-starch - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 14.2857142857143
    8. maltodextrin -> en:maltodextrind - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 12.5
    9. flavourings -> en:flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 11.1111111111111
    10. emulsifier -> en:emulsifier - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 10
      1. lecithin -> en:e322i - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 10
    11. colours -> en:colour - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 9.09090909090909
      1. e163 -> en:e163 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 9.09090909090909
    12. e162 -> en:e162 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 8.33333333333333
    13. e160a -> en:e160a - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - from_palm_oil: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 7.69230769230769
    14. e141 -> en:e141 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 7.14285714285714
    15. e153 -> en:e153 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 6.66666666666667
    16. palm kernel oil -> en:palm-kernel-oil - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - from_palm_oil: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 6.25
    17. concentrates -> en:concentrates - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5.88235294117647
      1. sweet potato -> en:sweet-potato - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5.88235294117647
      2. carthamus -> en:safflower - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 2.94117647058824
      3. radish -> en:radish - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 1.96078431372549

Nutrition

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    Poor nutritional quality


    ⚠️ Warning: the amount of fiber is not specified, their possible positive contribution to the grade could not be taken into account.
    ⚠️ Warning: the amount of fruits, vegetables and nuts is not specified on the label, it was estimated from the list of ingredients: 0

    This product is not considered a beverage for the calculation of the Nutri-Score.

    Positive points: 0

    • Proteins: 0 / 5 (value: 0, rounded value: 0)
    • Fiber: 0 / 5 (value: 0, rounded value: 0)
    • Fruits, vegetables, nuts, and colza/walnut/olive oils: 0 / 5 (value: 0, rounded value: 0)

    Negative points: 18

    • Energy: 5 / 10 (value: 1705, rounded value: 1705)
    • Sugars: 10 / 10 (value: 85.4, rounded value: 85.4)
    • Saturated fat: 3 / 10 (value: 3.3, rounded value: 3.3)
    • Sodium: 0 / 10 (value: 0, rounded value: 0)

    The points for proteins are not counted because the negative points are greater or equal to 11.

    Score nutritionnel: 18 (18 - 0)

    Nutri-Score: D

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    Sugars in high quantity (85.4%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of sugar can cause weight gain and tooth decay. It also augments the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of sugar and sugary drinks
    • Sugary drinks (such as sodas, fruit beverages, and fruit juices and nectars) should be limited as much as possible (no more than 1 glass a day).
    • Choose products with lower sugar content and reduce the consumption of products with added sugars.
  • icon

    Salt in low quantity (0%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
    • Many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, as there are often no symptoms.
    • Most people consume too much salt (on average 9 to 12 grams per day), around twice the recommended maximum level of intake.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of salt and salted food
    • Reduce the quantity of salt used when cooking, and don't salt again at the table.
    • Limit the consumption of salty snacks and choose products with lower salt content.

  • icon

    Nutrition facts


    Nutrition facts As sold
    for 100 g / 100 ml
    As sold
    per serving (45g)
    Compared to: Candies
    Energy 1,705 kj
    (403 kcal)
    767 kj
    (181 kcal)
    +15%
    Fat 5.9 g 2.66 g +226%
    Saturated fat 3.3 g 1.49 g +220%
    Carbohydrates 86.2 g 38.8 g +4%
    Sugars 85.4 g 38.4 g +52%
    Fiber ? ?
    Proteins 0 g 0 g -100%
    Salt 0 g 0 g -100%
    Fruits‚ vegetables‚ nuts and rapeseed‚ walnut and olive oils (estimate from ingredients list analysis) 0 % 0 %
Serving size: 45g

Environment

Carbon footprint

Packaging

Transportation

Threatened species

Data sources

Product added on by kiliweb
Last edit of product page on by inf.
Product page also edited by jumati, openfoodfacts-contributors, packbot, scrypt, sophiecool62, yuka.UVA4SkFvUUh1c01KeS9ZUzlSeUwvTUpUd0lTdGVGbU5kZlFYSWc9PQ, yuka.sY2b0xO6T85zoF3NwEKvlhBGUdjUhWrqaEblp3WT9s-nK463WPJI8ND0OKs.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.