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Hollywood max - 20 g e (10 dragées)

Hollywood max - 20 g e (10 dragées)

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Barcode: 7622210684691 (EAN / EAN-13)

Quantity: 20 g e (10 dragées)

Packaging: Box, Cardboard

Brands: Hollywood

Categories: Snacks, Sweet snacks, Confectioneries, Chewing gum, Sugar-free chewing gum

Labels, certifications, awards: Low or no sugar, No sugar, With sweeteners

Countries where sold: France

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Health

Nutrition

  • icon

    Nutrient levels


    • icon

      Sugars in low quantity (0%)


      What you need to know
      • A high consumption of sugar can cause weight gain and tooth decay. It also augments the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases.

      Recommendation: Limit the consumption of sugar and sugary drinks
      • Sugary drinks (such as sodas, fruit beverages, and fruit juices and nectars) should be limited as much as possible (no more than 1 glass a day).
      • Choose products with lower sugar content and reduce the consumption of products with added sugars.
    • icon

      Salt in low quantity (0%)


      What you need to know
      • A high consumption of salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
      • Many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, as there are often no symptoms.
      • Most people consume too much salt (on average 9 to 12 grams per day), around twice the recommended maximum level of intake.

      Recommendation: Limit the consumption of salt and salted food
      • Reduce the quantity of salt used when cooking, and don't salt again at the table.
      • Limit the consumption of salty snacks and choose products with lower salt content.

  • icon

    Nutrition facts


    Nutrition facts As sold
    for 100 g / 100 ml
    As sold
    per serving (1 dragée 2 g)
    Compared to: Sugar-free chewing gum
    Energy 71 kj
    (17 kcal)
    1.42 kj
    (0 kcal)
    -90%
    Fat 0 g 0 g -100%
    Saturated fat 0 g 0 g -100%
    Carbohydrates 70 g 1.4 g +7%
    Sugars 0 g 0 g -100%
    Fiber ? ?
    Proteins 0 g 0 g -100%
    Salt 0 g 0 g -100%
    Fruits‚ vegetables‚ nuts and rapeseed‚ walnut and olive oils (estimate from ingredients list analysis) 0 % 0 %
Serving size: 1 dragée 2 g

Ingredients

  • icon

    18 ingredients


    : Édulcorants (Xylitol, Isomalt, Sorbitol, Sirop de maltitol, Aspartame, Acésulfame K), Gomme base, Arômes, Stabilisant (E414), Émulsifiant (Lécithine de tournesol), humectant (E1518), colorants(E160a, E133).

Food processing

  • icon

    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E133 - Brilliant blue FCF
    • Additive: E160a - Carotene
    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Additive: E414 - Acacia gum
    • Additive: E420 - Sorbitol
    • Additive: E950 - Acesulfame k
    • Additive: E951 - Aspartame
    • Additive: E953 - Isomalt
    • Additive: E965 - Maltitol
    • Additive: E967 - Xylitol
    • Ingredient: Colour
    • Ingredient: Emulsifier
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Humectant
    • Ingredient: Sweetener

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E133 - Brilliant blue FCF


    Brilliant Blue FCF: Brilliant Blue FCF -Blue 1- is an organic compound classified as a triarylmethane dye and a blue azo dye, reflecting its chemical structure. Known under various commercial names, it is a colorant for foods and other substances. It is denoted by E number E133 and has a color index of 42090. It has the appearance of a blue powder. It is soluble in water, and the solution has a maximum absorption at about 628 nanometers.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E1518 - Glyceryl triacetate


    Triacetin: The triglyceride 1‚2,3-triacetoxypropane is more generally known as triacetin and glycerin triacetate. It is the triester of glycerol and acetylating agents, such as acetic acid and acetic anhydride. It is a colorless, viscous and odorless liquid with a high boiling point. Triacetin was first prepared in 1854 by the French chemist Marcellin Berthelot.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E160a - Carotene


    Carotene: The term carotene -also carotin, from the Latin carota, "carrot"- is used for many related unsaturated hydrocarbon substances having the formula C40Hx, which are synthesized by plants but in general cannot be made by animals -with the exception of some aphids and spider mites which acquired the synthesizing genes from fungi-. Carotenes are photosynthetic pigments important for photosynthesis. Carotenes contain no oxygen atoms. They absorb ultraviolet, violet, and blue light and scatter orange or red light, and -in low concentrations- yellow light. Carotenes are responsible for the orange colour of the carrot, for which this class of chemicals is named, and for the colours of many other fruits, vegetables and fungi -for example, sweet potatoes, chanterelle and orange cantaloupe melon-. Carotenes are also responsible for the orange -but not all of the yellow- colours in dry foliage. They also -in lower concentrations- impart the yellow coloration to milk-fat and butter. Omnivorous animal species which are relatively poor converters of coloured dietary carotenoids to colourless retinoids have yellowed-coloured body fat, as a result of the carotenoid retention from the vegetable portion of their diet. The typical yellow-coloured fat of humans and chickens is a result of fat storage of carotenes from their diets. Carotenes contribute to photosynthesis by transmitting the light energy they absorb to chlorophyll. They also protect plant tissues by helping to absorb the energy from singlet oxygen, an excited form of the oxygen molecule O2 which is formed during photosynthesis. β-Carotene is composed of two retinyl groups, and is broken down in the mucosa of the human small intestine by β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase to retinal, a form of vitamin A. β-Carotene can be stored in the liver and body fat and converted to retinal as needed, thus making it a form of vitamin A for humans and some other mammals. The carotenes α-carotene and γ-carotene, due to their single retinyl group -β-ionone ring-, also have some vitamin A activity -though less than β-carotene-, as does the xanthophyll carotenoid β-cryptoxanthin. All other carotenoids, including lycopene, have no beta-ring and thus no vitamin A activity -although they may have antioxidant activity and thus biological activity in other ways-. Animal species differ greatly in their ability to convert retinyl -beta-ionone- containing carotenoids to retinals. Carnivores in general are poor converters of dietary ionone-containing carotenoids. Pure carnivores such as ferrets lack β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase and cannot convert any carotenoids to retinals at all -resulting in carotenes not being a form of vitamin A for this species-; while cats can convert a trace of β-carotene to retinol, although the amount is totally insufficient for meeting their daily retinol needs.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithins are natural compounds commonly used in the food industry as emulsifiers and stabilizers.

    Extracted from sources like soybeans and eggs, lecithins consist of phospholipids that enhance the mixing of oil and water, ensuring smooth textures in various products like chocolates, dressings, and baked goods.

    They do not present any known health risks.

  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithins are natural compounds commonly used in the food industry as emulsifiers and stabilizers.

    Extracted from sources like soybeans and eggs, lecithins consist of phospholipids that enhance the mixing of oil and water, ensuring smooth textures in various products like chocolates, dressings, and baked goods.

    They do not present any known health risks.

  • E414 - Acacia gum


    Gum arabic: Gum arabic, also known as acacia gum, arabic gum, gum acacia, acacia, Senegal gum and Indian gum, and by other names, is a natural gum consisting of the hardened sap of various species of the acacia tree. Originally, gum arabic was collected from Acacia nilotica which was called the "gum arabic tree"; in the present day, gum arabic is collected from acacia species, predominantly Acacia senegal and Vachellia -Acacia- seyal; the term "gum arabic" does not indicate a particular botanical source. In a few cases so‐called "gum arabic" may not even have been collected from Acacia species, but may originate from Combretum, Albizia or some other genus. Producers harvest the gum commercially from wild trees, mostly in Sudan -80%- and throughout the Sahel, from Senegal to Somalia—though it is historically cultivated in Arabia and West Asia. Gum arabic is a complex mixture of glycoproteins and polysaccharides. It is the original source of the sugars arabinose and ribose, both of which were first discovered and isolated from it, and are named after it. Gum arabic is soluble in water. It is edible, and used primarily in the food industry as a stabilizer, with EU E number E414. Gum arabic is a key ingredient in traditional lithography and is used in printing, paint production, glue, cosmetics and various industrial applications, including viscosity control in inks and in textile industries, though less expensive materials compete with it for many of these roles. While gum arabic is now produced throughout the African Sahel, it is still harvested and used in the Middle East.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E420 - Sorbitol


    Sorbitol: Sorbitol --, less commonly known as glucitol --, is a sugar alcohol with a sweet taste which the human body metabolizes slowly. It can be obtained by reduction of glucose, which changes the aldehyde group to a hydroxyl group. Most sorbitol is made from corn syrup, but it is also found in nature, for example in apples, pears, peaches, and prunes. It is converted to fructose by sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. Sorbitol is an isomer of mannitol, another sugar alcohol; the two differ only in the orientation of the hydroxyl group on carbon 2. While similar, the two sugar alcohols have very different sources in nature, melting points, and uses.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E950 - Acesulfame k


    Acesulfame potassium: Acesulfame potassium - AY-see-SUL-faym-, also known as acesulfame K -K is the symbol for potassium- or Ace K, is a calorie-free sugar substitute -artificial sweetener- often marketed under the trade names Sunett and Sweet One. In the European Union, it is known under the E number -additive code- E950. It was discovered accidentally in 1967 by German chemist Karl Clauss at Hoechst AG -now Nutrinova-. In chemical structure, acesulfame potassium is the potassium salt of 6-methyl-1‚2,3-oxathiazine-4-3H--one 2‚2-dioxide. It is a white crystalline powder with molecular formula C4H4KNO4S and a molecular weight of 201.24 g/mol.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E951 - Aspartame


    Aspartame: Aspartame -APM- is an artificial non-saccharide sweetener used as a sugar substitute in some foods and beverages. In the European Union, it is codified as E951. Aspartame is a methyl ester of the aspartic acid/phenylalanine dipeptide. A panel of experts set up by the European Food Safety Authority concluded in 2013 that aspartame is safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure. As of 2018, evidence does not support a long-term benefit for weight loss or in diabetes. Because its breakdown products include phenylalanine, people with the genetic condition phenylketonuria -PKU- must be aware of this as an additional source.It was first sold under the brand name NutraSweet. It was first made in 1965, and the patent expired in 1992. It was initially approved for use in food products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration -FDA- in 1981. The safety of aspartame has been the subject of several political and medical controversies, United States congressional hearings, and Internet hoaxes.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E953 - Isomalt


    Isomalt: Isomalt is a sugar substitute, a type of sugar alcohol used primarily for its sugar-like physical properties. It has little to no impact on blood sugar levels, and does not stimulate the release of insulin. It also does not promote tooth decay, i.e. is tooth-friendly. Its energy value is 2 kcal/g, half that of sugars. However, like most sugar alcohols, it carries a risk of gastric distress, including flatulence and diarrhea, when consumed in large quantities -above about 20-30 g per day-. Isomalt may prove upsetting to the intestinal tract because it is incompletely absorbed in the small intestine, and when polyols pass into the large intestine, they can cause osmotically induced diarrhea and stimulate the gut flora, causing flatulence. As with other dietary fibers, regular consumption of isomalt can lead to desensitisation, decreasing the risk of intestinal upset. Isomalt can be blended with high-intensity sweeteners such as sucralose, giving a mixture that has the same sweetness as sugar. Isomalt is an equimolar mixture of two mutually diastereomeric disaccharides, each composed of two sugars: glucose and mannitol -α-D-glucopyranosido-1‚6-mannitol- and also glucose and sorbitol -α-D-glucopyranosido-1‚6-sorbitol-. Complete hydrolysis of isomalt yields glucose -50%-, sorbitol -25%-, and mannitol -25%-. It is an odorless, white, crystalline substance containing about 5% water of crystallisation. Isomalt has a minimal cooling effect -positive heat of solution-, lower than many other sugar alcohols, in particular, xylitol and erythritol. Isomalt is manufactured in a two-stage process in which sucrose is first transformed into isomaltulose, a reducing disaccharide -6-O-α-D-glucopyranosido-D-fructose-. The isomaltulose is then hydrogenated, using a Raney nickel catalyst. The final product — isomalt — is an equimolar composition of 6-O-α-D-glucopyranosido-D-sorbitol -1‚6-GPS- and 1-O-α-D-glucopyranosido-D-mannitol-dihydrate -1‚1-GPM-dihydrate-. Isomalt has been approved for use in the United States since 1990. It is also permitted for use in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Iran, the European Union, and other countries. Isomalt is widely used for the production of sugar-free candy, especially hard-boiled candy, because it resists crystallisation much better than the standard combinations of sucrose and corn syrup. It is used in sugar sculpture for the same reason.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E965 - Maltitol


    Maltitol: Maltitol is a sugar alcohol -a polyol- used as a sugar substitute. It has 75–90% of the sweetness of sucrose -table sugar- and nearly identical properties, except for browning. It is used to replace table sugar because it is half as caloric, does not promote tooth decay, and has a somewhat lesser effect on blood glucose. In chemical terms, maltitol is known as 4-O-α-glucopyranosyl-D-sorbitol. It is used in commercial products under trade names such as Lesys, Maltisweet and SweetPearl.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E965ii - Maltitol syrup


    Maltitol: Maltitol is a sugar alcohol -a polyol- used as a sugar substitute. It has 75–90% of the sweetness of sucrose -table sugar- and nearly identical properties, except for browning. It is used to replace table sugar because it is half as caloric, does not promote tooth decay, and has a somewhat lesser effect on blood glucose. In chemical terms, maltitol is known as 4-O-α-glucopyranosyl-D-sorbitol. It is used in commercial products under trade names such as Lesys, Maltisweet and SweetPearl.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E967 - Xylitol


    Xylitol: Xylitol is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener. The name derives from Ancient Greek: ξύλον, xyl[on], "wood" + suffix -itol, used to denote sugar alcohols. Xylitol is categorized as a polyalcohol or sugar alcohol -specifically an alditol-. It has the formula CH2OH-CHOH-3CH2OH. It is a colorless or white solid that is soluble in water. Use of manufactured products containing xylitol may reduce tooth decay.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients


    : Édulcorants (Xylitol, Isomalt, Sorbitol, Sirop de maltitol, Aspartame, Acésulfame K), Gomme base, Arômes, Stabilisant (e414), Émulsifiant (Lécithine de tournesol), humectant (e1518), colorants (e160a, e133)
    1. Édulcorants -> en:sweetener - percent_min: 25 - percent_max: 100
      1. Xylitol -> en:e967 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 4.16666666666667 - percent_max: 100
      2. Isomalt -> en:e953 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 50
      3. Sorbitol -> en:e420 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 33.3333333333333
      4. Sirop de maltitol -> en:e965ii - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
      5. Aspartame -> en:e951 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 20
      6. Acésulfame K -> en:e950 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 16.6666666666667
    2. Gomme base -> en:gum-base - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 50
    3. Arômes -> en:flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
    4. Stabilisant -> en:stabiliser - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
      1. e414 -> en:e414 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
    5. Émulsifiant -> en:emulsifier - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
      1. Lécithine de tournesol -> en:sunflower-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
    6. humectant -> en:humectant - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
      1. e1518 -> en:e1518 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
    7. colorants -> en:colour - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
      1. e160a -> en:e160a - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - from_palm_oil: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5
      2. e133 -> en:e133 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 2.5

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Data sources

Product added on by openfoodfacts-contributors
Last edit of product page on by packbot.
Product page also edited by beniben, kiliweb, segundo, yuka.PIAbbNKFQ-sZFd_Y9qEPgyOEGO74Wf9SMkwnog, yuka.sY2b0xO6T85zoF3NwEKvlmJ4S9zaj27_L0TVsFOk6YiEE7jRRM0o2JH1HKo.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.