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Pan de higo con chocolate - Capo - 250 g

Pan de higo con chocolate - Capo - 250 g

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Barcode: 8413365031596 (EAN / EAN-13)

Common name: Pan de higo con chocolate

Quantity: 250 g

Packaging: Plastic

Brands: Capo

Categories: Plant-based foods and beverages, Plant-based foods, Snacks, Sweet snacks, Confectioneries, Festive foods, Christmas foods and drinks, Dried products, Christmas sweets, Dried plant-based foods, Dried fig cakes

Labels, certifications, awards: Low or no salt, No gluten, No added salt

Manufacturing or processing places: España

Stores: Carrefour

Countries where sold: Spain

Matching with your preferences

Health

Ingredients

  • icon

    13 ingredients


    Spanish: Higos, almendras, anís, azúcar, pasta de cacao, manteca de cacao, emulgente: lecitina de girasol, glucosa, sorbitol, E-476, aroma. Cacao 44% mínimo.
    Allergens: Nuts

Food processing

  • icon

    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Additive: E420 - Sorbitol
    • Additive: E476 - Polyglycerol polyricinoleate
    • Ingredient: Emulsifier
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Glucose

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E420 - Sorbitol


    Sorbitol: Sorbitol --, less commonly known as glucitol --, is a sugar alcohol with a sweet taste which the human body metabolizes slowly. It can be obtained by reduction of glucose, which changes the aldehyde group to a hydroxyl group. Most sorbitol is made from corn syrup, but it is also found in nature, for example in apples, pears, peaches, and prunes. It is converted to fructose by sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. Sorbitol is an isomer of mannitol, another sugar alcohol; the two differ only in the orientation of the hydroxyl group on carbon 2. While similar, the two sugar alcohols have very different sources in nature, melting points, and uses.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E476 - Polyglycerol polyricinoleate


    Polyglycerol polyricinoleate: Polyglycerol polyricinoleate -PGPR-, E476, is an emulsifier made from glycerol and fatty acids -usually from castor bean, but also from soybean oil-. In chocolate, compound chocolate and similar coatings, PGPR is mainly used with another substance like lecithin to reduce viscosity. It is used at low levels -below 0.5%-, and works by decreasing the friction between the solid particles -e.g. cacao, sugar, milk- in molten chocolate, reducing the yield stress so that it flows more easily, approaching the behaviour of a Newtonian fluid. It can also be used as an emulsifier in spreads and in salad dressings, or to improve the texture of baked goods. It is made up of a short chain of glycerol molecules connected by ether bonds, with ricinoleic acid side chains connected by ester bonds. PGPR is a yellowish, viscous liquid, and is strongly lipophilic: it is soluble in fats and oils and insoluble in water and ethanol.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients


    Higos, _almendras_, anís, azúcar, pasta de cacao, manteca de cacao, emulgente (lecitina de girasol), glucosa, sorbitol, e476, aroma, Cacao 44%
    1. Higos -> en:fig - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    2. _almendras_ -> en:almond - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    3. anís -> en:aniseed - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    4. azúcar -> en:sugar - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    5. pasta de cacao -> en:cocoa-paste - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    6. manteca de cacao -> en:cocoa-butter - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    7. emulgente -> en:emulsifier
      1. lecitina de girasol -> en:sunflower-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    8. glucosa -> en:glucose - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    9. sorbitol -> en:e420 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    10. e476 -> en:e476 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    11. aroma -> en:flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe
    12. Cacao -> en:cocoa - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent: 44

Nutrition

Environment

Transportation

Data sources

Product added on by neptuno
Last edit of product page on by packbot.
Product page also edited by musarana.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.